whartons strength zone

Springing into Shape

“After the winter, there will be spring.” We can all take comfort in these profound words of Chauncey Gardner in the movie Being There. During this time of year, we yearn for warmth; cold and wind has challenged those of us who thrive to move outside in nature. Sprains and strains in the ice, dislocations and fractures from the slopes, general muscle fiber tightening, and howling winds all conspire to weaken our resolve. Injuries during winter’s dark days deter us from vital sunshine and our beloved daily workout rituals. 

How can we transition into spring healthy, ready to enjoy warmer months? We can begin by renewing our muscular system. Here’s two essentials from The Whartons Strength Zone® One—Hip & Trunk. 

Lower Abdominals. Michael Del Monte Photograph

Lower Abdominals. Michael Del Monte Photograph

1.Lower Abdominals—Lie on back. Bend knees and hips at 90 degree angles. Extend arms over head and grab a stable surface—table or bed for support. Maintain the 90-degree angle of your hip and knee. Raise your pelvis off the surface. Slowly return to start position. Add resistance by placing an ankle weight looped around your ankles. Repeat for 10-12 repetitions. 

Sacrospinalis. Michael Del Monte Photograph

Sacrospinalis. Michael Del Monte Photograph

 

2.Sacrospinalis—Lie face down on table or bed. Your hips should be on the edge of the surface. Straighten your legs. Turn your toes inward. Hands may grasp table or bed for support. Head rests to one side. Raise your legs to mid-line position with your trunk. Slowly return to start position. Ankle weights may be looped around ankle to increase resistance. Repeat for 10-12 repetitions. 

 

Enjoy these two extended core exercises, great additions to your strength training program. These exercises can be found in the Whartons Compete Strength Book, Whartons on Demand Streaming Channel, Whartons Strength for Athletes and Everyone DVD, and Whartons Digital Downloads. 

Hallux Rigidus—“Big Toe”


Hallux Rigidus—“Big Toe”

 

Jammed. Stubbed. Bruised, or just locked up—our big toe can ground our locomotion. The big toe is the most important of the five. The hallux, or “great toe” is our vital point of contact with landing surfaces in walking, running, for movement. If you are experiencing pain, irritation, soreness, or lack of mobility you may have hallux rigidus.

 

What it is?

Hallux rigidus, is caused by range of motion loss in the joint that connects the great toe and first metatarsal. There is pain walking and in many cases with any pressure or weight bearing.

 

Reset it

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Step One: Sit on a flat surface with one leg in front of you. Bend the exercising at the knee at a 90-degree angle. Grab the top of your foot with both hands. Exhale. Extend your big toe toward the floor. Stabilize the other toes. Gently assist the toe downward within its natural end range of motion. Inhale. Return to start position. Repeat for 8-10 reps. This relaxes and lengthens the Toe Extensors. Join the Whartons Streaming Video Channel to access the full menu of videos on any device.

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Step Two: Sit on a flat surface with one leg in front of you. Bend the exercising at the knee at a 90-degree angle. Grab the top of your foot with both hands. Exhale. Flex your big toe upward. Gently assist with one hand at your natural end range of motion. Inhale. Return to start position. Repeat for 8-10 reps. This relaxes and lengthens the Toe Flexors.